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The way we were

Discuss equipment which does not fit in in the other forums here, like cable cranes, material handlers, drilling, piling and screen equipment

FatCatGotHot
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Re: The way we were

Post #381 by FatCatGotHot » Wed Jun 28, 2017 1:44 pm

FOWLER MAN wrote:Hi All,
I haven't posted on this thread for a while but I came across this pic. which took me back to a past age.
Don't know if this is classic plant or vintage like me. :lol: But I remember watching this duo work circa 1957/8 at a local cement works quarry.
The shunting loco was then about five or six years old and built by John Fowler of Leeds. It was powered by the same Meadows 6DJ970 engine that Fowlers used in the Challenger 4 crawler.
Surprising to me, (having been brought up to believe that British Engineering was supreme and nothing else was any good), :roll: was the electric powered face shovel. It was made in Germany by Menck & Hambrock. It was apparently a pre-war machine dating back to the 1930s and had, at the time, already given over twenty years service.
Fred

Image


Hi Fowler Man,

thank you very much for your post on this picture. I always thougt of the UK as one of the leading shovel manufacturing countries in Europe - well, see this especially for the first half of the 20th century, like it is shown in the documentary "Teeth Of Steel". So I am quite surprised, too, to see this Menck working in a British quarry in the 50ies. Not from a technical view, because these shovels oud reach over 40 years of working life.

I was courius if I could determine the type of shovel depictured. I was browsing through mich archive and I'm pretty shure that this machine is a Modell E, also called ME. Which is quite nice, too, because just 25 were ever produced. Weighing 350,000 pounds, the ME had a 4.3cy bucket and 516 HP combined. Very sturdy and high undercarriage, and the upper works were armored with 1cm steel plates. Tuff shovel, nice find!

Cheers,

Max

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FOWLER MAN
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Re: The way we were

Post #382 by FOWLER MAN » Wed Jul 26, 2017 10:07 pm

Hi All,
I thought I'd like to share a few great pics and some of my early memories with you.
I have been trying to date the first picture of a Willment Bros. site in London. The navvy in centre stage provides the clue. It's a 54 RB and I am reliably informed that the third 54 RB to be produced by Rustons Serial No.7990 was delivered to Willment Bros. in 1943 and my gut feeling is that the pic. dates from 1946/7.
Image
The 54 would have been powered by the legendary Ruston 5VCBN and if you look at the pic. you can see the five individual straight through exhausts sticking through the roof. I loved to watch these at work, particularly when the engine slowed down under load , you could almost hear every cylinder firing and at dusk the roar would be accompanied by a tongue of flame from each pipe.
I believe the other two navvies are Ruston 21Bs which were produced till about 1938 and if you think the bonneted tippers look ancient, they are Leylands like the ones the local council used circa 1946 when I was often late for school watching the steam rollers firing up in the mornings.
! can't identify the forward control tipper, they all looked so alike. :lol:

Fred


Jeremy Rowland
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Re: The way we were

Post #383 by Jeremy Rowland » Thu Jul 27, 2017 7:30 am

FOWLER MAN wrote:Hi All,
I thought I'd like to share a few great pics and some of my early memories with you.
I have been trying to date the first picture of a Willment Bros. site in London. The navvy in centre stage provides the clue. It's a 54 RB and I am reliably informed that the third 54 RB to be produced by Rustons Serial No.7990 was delivered to Willment Bros. in 1943 and my gut feeling is that the pic. dates from 1946/7.
Image
The 54 would have been powered by the legendary Ruston 5VCBN and if you look at the pic. you can see the five individual straight through exhausts sticking through the roof. I loved to watch these at work, particularly when the engine slowed down under load , you could almost hear every cylinder firing and at dusk the roar would be accompanied by a tongue of flame from each pipe.
I believe the other two navvies are Ruston 21Bs which were produced till about 1938 and if you think the bonneted tippers look ancient, they are Leylands like the ones the local council used circa 1946 when I was often late for school watching the steam rollers firing up in the mornings.
! can't identify the forward control tipper, they all looked so alike. :lol:

Fred


You had the love of it at an early age Fred just like me and like many others who love plant and construction equipment. :thumbup:

Jeremy


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